Tsakhur

Tsakhur is very well known, at least as regards the Mishlesh dialect, thanks to the collective grammar edited by A. E. Kibrik (1997). For the present project Timur Maisak, one of the coauthors of the grammar, is translating and glossing the collection of folklore texts edited by Omarov (2009).

Source

K. Omarov

Investigator

T. Maisak

Files

Karata

Karata belongs to the Andic branch of the East-Caucasian language family. There are 8 Andic languages: Karata, Akhvakh, Andi, Botlikh, Godoberi, Bagvalal, Chamalal, and Tindi.

The available literature on Karata mainly consists of a grammar by Zagidat Magomedbekova published in 1971, a dictionary, published in 2001 by Patimat Magomedova and Rashidat Khalidova (professor at the Pedagogical University of Makhachkala), as well as a collection of fairy tales edited and published by R. Khalidova in 2018.

For IMMOCAL, Jérémy Pasquereau will gloss and translate into Russian twenty of these tales. In collaboration with Rashidat Khalidova, he will write a paper on the uses of Tense Mood Aspect categories in this corpus.

Collaborator

Prof. Rashidat Khalidova (State Univ., Makhachkala)

Investigator

J. Pasquereau

Rutul dialects

Southern Rutul

Şin, Azerbaijan

The Southern Rutul dialect documented in this project is that of Novyj Borch in Dagestan and Shin in the Sheki region of Azerbaijan, which present two recent offshoots from the dialect of the (now uninhabited) village of Borch under the influence of Russian and Azeri respectively. A variant of this dialect is spoken at Khnov in Dagestan. This language is very closely related to, though not mutually comprehensible with, the Northern Rutul dialects familiar from Ibragimov (1978), Alekseev (1994) and Makhmudova (2001).

Investigator

G. Authier

Files

Northern Rutul – Ikhrek

Investigator

G. Authier

Files

Northern Rutul – Mukhad

Collaborator

Prof. Svetlana Makhmudova (State Univ. Makhachkala)

Investigator

G. Authier

Files

Kryz

Kryz is spoken in a few villages in Azerbaijan, each of which has its own highly distinct dialect. The majority of the folklore texts documented here were narrated by Maclis Shamseddinov, and belong to the Alik dialect described by Authier (2009). The dialects of Haci Hetemli and the village of Kryz itself have been documented more recently by Monika Rind-Pawlowski, whose transcriptions are glossed here by G. Authier.

Kryz dialect

Collaborator

M. Rind-Pawlowski

Investigator

G. Authier

Files

Cek dialect

Investigator

G. Authier

Files

Alik dialect

Source

M. Shamseddinov

Investigator

G. Authier

Files

Haci Hetemli dialect

Collaborator

M. Rind-Pawlowski

Investigator

G. Authier

Files

Southern Lezgian dialects

Lezgian is one of the major literary languages of Dagestan, well known in the West thanks to Haspelmath (1993). Numerous dialects exist, some of which are spoken in Azerbaijan, where they have gone almost entirely undocumented. Ayten Babaliyeva (post-doc) is a speaker of the dialect of Yargun (Hazri), in the border region of Qusar; for this project she has also documented dialects spoken further south in the Qebele and Ismailli regions.

Investigator

A. Babaliyeva

Dargi dialects

Кайтагский район (openstreet maps)

Kaytag Dargi

Kaytag Dargi is spoken in the Kaytag region of Dagestan, whose administrative centre is Madzhalis. It is not mutually comprehensible with the other Dargi languages, the most thoroughly studied of which are Akusha Dargi, which forms the basis of the literary language, and Kubachi. The two collections re-edited here represent one Upper Kaytag variety, spoken in the village of Shilagi (U. Hasanova), and one Lower Kaytag variety, spoken in the village of Dzhavghat (Kh. Habibova).

Collaborator

Prof. U. Hasanova (State Univ. Makhachkala)

Informant

Kh. Khabibova

Investigator

G. Authier

Files

Tsugni Dargi

Informant

Gasangusen Sulaibanov

Investigator

G. Authier

Files